The week in publishing (February 4 through February 10)

Posted By on February 11, 2013

Here’s some of the latest in industry news and views:

Publishers Weekly: When a Cover Can Ruin a Book
I know I’ve ranted about my utter distaste of covers with photographs of real people, especially teenagers on them, but a friend shared a cover with me that made me gasp. There is a new book that has the first three Anne of Green Gables in one collection. I think having the first three books together is a great idea, as folks often read the first one and come racing back for the next two in the series, so it’s good to make their lives easier and let them stay with Anne uninterrupted. The problem is the cover.

From Writer’s Fun Zone: Are Book Contests Worth The Money 
A common question many authors with a newly minted book have is whether or not they should enter book competitions and book contests. Entry fees can seem steep, and many authors—especially those who have self-published—are on a tight budget. The main disadvantage to contests, of course, is the fact that there is no guarantee of winning. It can be tough for some authors to part with a chunk of money that may or may not bring a reward.

From C.J. Ortiz: SELF-PUBLISHING: WHAT IT IS—AND WHAT IT ISN’T
One of the most confusing things about self-publishing is what exactly constitutes self-publishing. For every right answer to this question there are about a dozen wrong answers. Particularly in the past decade, since the inception of POD (print on demand), there are a lot of inaccuracies out there. I’m going to do my best to set you straight.

From The Book Shepherd: Every Author Needs a Copyright Page
One of the most common questions that authors ask is about the Copyright page and “What should my copyright page look like?” Good question, here’s an answer:

From Huffington Post: Nine Writing Mistakes You’re Probably Making
For writing, it’s the best of times and it’s the worst of times. Best, because more people are engaged in the act of writing than at any other time in human history. When I was young, the written word belonged to professionals, who had to pass through stern gatekeepers before reaching that status.

 

 

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